Roaches
 
     
   
     
 
   
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Roach Facts
   
 

Cockroaches in homes are a health hazard to many children and families because of the risks cockroach antigens pose to asthma sufferers. Traditionally, cockroaches were controlled because they are offensive, leave behind an awful smell, and cause gastrointestinal and respiratory illness. However, research shows that cockroach debris (old shells, saliva, body parts, and droppings) triggers asthma attacks in people who are sensitized to cockroach antigen (proteins found in the debris). In homes where several allergens are present, including dust mites, mold, furry pets, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, children may experience severe and frequent asthma attacks from high airborne concentrations of these allergens.

Any home with food or moisture can have cockroaches. Kitchens and bathrooms typically have the highest number of cockroaches due to the presence of food products and moisture from plumbing fixtures. Apartment buildings often have the worst infestations. The goal is to keep cockroaches out of the home and to eliminate existing pests. Reaching this goal is not always easy, especially in multi-unit housing that is already infested. For most apartment buildings, the landlord must take a building-wide approach to controlling these pests. Moreover, a coordinated effort by the landlord and all tenants is required to eliminate cockroaches.

Advanced Pest Prevention's Integrated pest management techniques control cockroaches through barrier control and other interventions. We offer safe and effective pest management techniques which never exacerbate asthma symptoms, and we have a very high success rate at ridding homes of cockroaches.

Because children spend more time indoors, allergens found in homes and other buildings pose a significant health risk for asthma sufferers. With asthma rates growing at a startling rate, the hazard posed by the presence of any cockroaches must be addressed.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

German Cockroach

SIZE: Adults are about 5/8 inch long (17mm)

COLOR: Adult German cockroaches are light brown except for the shield behind the head marked with two dark stripes, which run lengthwise on the body. Young roaches are wingless and nearly black with a single light stripe running down the middle of the back. Egg capsules are light tan.

DESCRIPTION: German cockroaches, Blattella germanica (L.), are the most common roaches found in houses and restaurants. Most cockroaches have a flattened, oval shape, spiny legs, and long, filamentous antennae. Immature stages are smaller, have undeveloped wings and resemble the adults. They eat food of all kinds and may hitchhike into the house on egg cartons, soft drink cartons, sacks of potatoes or onions, used furniture, beer cases, etc.

HABITAT: They can develop into large populations and live throughout the house, especially in the kitchen and bathroom. During the day, these roaches may be found hiding clustered behind baseboard molding, in cracks around cabinets, closets or pantries, and in and under stoves, refrigerators and dishwashers. When seen during the day in clusters, the population is large.

LIFE CYCLE: German cockroach females, unlike most other roaches, carry the egg capsule protruding from their abdomen until the eggs are ready to hatch. The case is then placed in a secluded location, with the nymphs emerging one to two days later. A female may produce four to six cases during her lifetime, each containing 30 to 40 eggs. Eggs hatch in 28 to 30 days, and nymphs develop in 40 to 125 days. Female roaches live about 200 days and males not as long. The roach produces more eggs and has more generations per year (three to four) than other roaches, and only a few individuals are needed to develop into troublesome infestations.

TYPE OF DAMAGE: Roaches can foul food, damage wallpaper and books, eat glue from furniture, and produce an unpleasant odor. Some homeowners are allergic to roaches. The pests can contaminate food with certain bacterial diseases that result in food poisoning, dysentery, or diarrhea.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Palmetto Bugs
   

Order: Blattaria
Family: Blattidae
Species: Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus)
AKA: Palmetto bug



An example of a palmetto egg sack.

Size:
The American cockroach is a large cockroach, adults are approximately 1-1/2 inches long (38mm).

Color:
The adult is a shiny reddish brown to dark brown and has a yellow margin on the pronotum (region directly behind the head). Immature American cockroaches are also reddish brown to dark brown in color and often have yellow markings on the abdomen.

Description:
Adult American cockroaches have wings and will occasionally fly. However, they are awkward fliers and prefer to run when disturbed. Male and female American cockroaches are about the same size and look very similar. Both have a pair of cerci, finger-like appendages, at the tips of their abdomens. The cerci are used to detect air currents in the cockroach's surroundings. Male cockroaches have an additional set of appendages called styli on their abdomens. The styli are located between the cerci but are smaller and more delicate. The presence of styli is the easiest way to distinguish male from female cockroaches. Immature

American cockroaches resemble adults, except they are wingless. The American cockroach egg capsules are mahogany brown and about 1/3 inch long.

Habitat:
American cockroaches are a "peridomestic species" this means that they generally live outdoors. However, populations can also move indoors and live in human structures. American cockroaches usually live in moist, humid environments but can survive in dry areas if they have access to water. The cockroaches prefer temperatures between 70°F and 85°F and will not survive 15°F. In structures, American cockroaches are common in areas where food is prepared or stored and moisture is plentiful. They are frequently found in restaurants, grocery stores, and bakeries. They are also commonly associated with boiler rooms, sewers, steam tunnels, and other warm, moist locations. In residential and commercial buildings, American cockroaches usually infest basements, crawl spaces, bathrooms, and decorative landscaping. Indoor populations tend to forage outdoors during warm weather. Likewise, during the winter months, populations established outdoors will venture inside seeking moisture and warmth.

Life Cycle:
After mating, the female American cockroach will produce an egg case in three to seven days. She will carry the egg case protruding from the tip of her abdomen for another two days. The egg case is then deposited in a hidden location and glued to a surface with the female's saliva. Hiding the egg case helps to protect it from predators, parasites, and pest technicians. Each egg case contains an average of 15 embryos. The immature cockroaches will emerge in 24 to 38 days under warm conditions. They will complete their development and become reproductive in six to 12 months. Adult American cockroaches can live approximately a year to a year and a half. An adult female will produce between six and 14 egg cases during her lifetime.

Type of Damage:
American cockroaches feed on a wide variety of materials, including cosmetics, beer, potted plant shoots, wallpaper paste, soap, postage stamps, and fermenting fruit. They can foul human food, clothing, paper goods, and surfaces with their feces and body parts. American cockroaches also produce a strong unpleasant odor. This characteristic odor is not only detectable in infested buildings but is also transferred to items that the cockroaches crawl across when foraging. So a pest management professional can often detect an American cockroach infestation before he has actually seen any cockroaches.

Health Risks:
When American cockroaches aggregate, their presence is primarily an aesthetic nuisance. However, members of this species are also known to carry infectious bacteria on their bodies and in their gut. These bacteria may be transferred to food and other items that the cockroaches contact. Several bacteria commonly associated with American cockroaches are known to cause food poisoning, dysentery, and diarrhea in humans. American cockroaches also produce allergens on their bodies and in their fecal material. While American cockroaches are not considered to be major culprits of human respiratory problems like some other cockroach species, they have been implicated as a cause of allergic dermatitis and childhood asthma.

 
 
 
   
   
Like Us on Facebook Residential Treatment Commercial Treatment Termites & Termite Control About Advanced Pest Prevention Request An Inspection Termites & Termite Control Roaches Ants Silverfish & More Link to Termidors website Return to Home Page